How to Use an AWS EDP for Discounted Cloud Resources

Lately, many of our AWS customers (especially those purchasing through the AWS marketplace) have mentioned that they are using an AWS EDP, which stands for Amazon Web Services Enterprise Discount Program. Essentially, this is AWS’s way to provide enterprises a discount off its services based on a volume (consumption) commitment. In the most recent Flexera State of the Cloud Report, 37% of respondents using AWS reported using an EDP.

How does an AWS EDP work?

AWS’s website does not provide a lot of information about these agreements, which is perhaps to be expected considering they will customize the terms for any given customer. Here’s what they say: “Customers also have the option to enroll in an Enterprise Agreement with AWS. Enterprise Agreements give customers the option to tailor agreements that best suit their needs. For additional information on Enterprise Agreements please contact your sales representative.”

There are a few things you should consider about the EDP contract terms you agree upon with AWS. For example, the agreement may be limited to certain accounts, services, and/or regions.

You’ll see big numbers in the news, such as Apple’s $30 million monthly on AWS or Pinterest’s $750 million multi-year deal — but even if you’re not a tech giant or a unicorn startup, an Amazon EDP can still be on the table and a way to get an across-the-board discount.

What Other Agreements Compare to an AWS EDP?

Other terms used with a similar concept include Site License, Enterprise Agreement (this is a common Microsoft term — EA), Volume Purchase Agreement (VPA) and All You Can Eat (AYCE). What all of these have in common is that the vendor gets a large revenue/spend commit, and the enterprise gets discounting and flexibility.

How Else can you Get an AWS Discount?

Should You Use an AWS EDP?

Originally published at www.parkmycloud.com on October 22, 2020.

CEO of ParkMyCloud