4 Types of Idle Cloud Resources That Are Wasting Your Money

Even the Cloud Providers are Talking About It

The Cost of Idle Resources

4 Types of Idle Cloud Resources

  • On Demand Instances/VMs — this is the core of the conversation, and what we’ve addressed above. On demand resources — and their associated scale groups — are frequently left running when they’re not being used, especially those used for non-production purposes.
  • Databases — there’s no doubt that databases are frequently left running when not needed as well, in similar circumstances to the On Demand resources, particularly non-production. The problem is whether you can park them to cut back on wasted spend. AWS allows you to park certain types of its RDS services like Neptune and Redshift databases, RDS instances and Google Cloud SQL. Make sure you review your database infrastructure regularly and terminate anything unnecessary — or change to a smaller size if possible.
  • Load Balancers — AWS Elastic Load Balancers (ELB) cannot be stopped (or parked), so to avoid getting billed for the time you need to remove it. The same can be said for Azure Load Balancer and GCP Load Balancers. Alerts can be set up in Cloudwatch/Azure Metrics/Google Stackdriver when you have a load balancer with no instances, so be sure to make use of those alerts.
  • Containers — optimizing container use is a project of its own, but there’s no doubt that container services can be a source of waste. It’s important that you regularly review the usage of your containers and the utilization of the infrastructure, especially in non-production environments. In the last few months, ParkMyCloud has released support for Amazon EKS, Azure AKS and Google Cloud GKE so customers can make sure their idle resources are parked.

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